Posts Tagged ‘Until the End of the World’

Postapokalyptische Abenteuer in Coober Pedy

Donnerstag, August 30th, 2012

Der Aufbruch in Adelaide verzögerte sich natürlich. Das ist ja immer so. Man will um 8 Uhr morgens losfahren, um möglichst weit zu kommen, aber mit sechs Leuten fallen auch fünf noch Dinge ein, die noch ganz schnell gemacht werden müssen. (Ich war natürlich abfahrbereit.) Aber wenn die Sonne schon gegen 17 Uhr hinter dem Horizont verschwindet und man campt, ist ein frühes Losfahren eigentlich unabdingbar. Oder man nimmt halt in Kauf, unterwegs nicht so viel zu sehen, wie eigentlich geplant. Wie an diesem ersten Tag, an dem wir außer dem wahrlich nicht sehenswerten Stadtzentrum von Port Augusta eigentlich nur gefahren sind. Rosie und Nikki mit mir in Serenity, Lok and Tae mit Mona in ihrem namenslosen, älteren Namensvetter meines Autos.

(weiterlesen …)

Bis ans Ende der Welt – Minute Movie Review

Freitag, August 20th, 2010

Review:

Until the End of the World was a passion project for director Wim Wenders, who spend 14 years on it, filming in a dozen countries on four continents along the way. The story is both incredibly simple and extremely complex. Solveig Dommartin falls in love with hitch-hiker who robs her William Hurt and follows him around the globe, while also being pursued and followed by several other people, including her ex Sam Neill. So the first two-thirds of the film are basically a global road movie, set in the distant future of 1999 (the film was finished in ’91) where a malfunctioning nuclear satellite threatens the world. But it’s not only a road movie, but also a science fiction story about that ever popular theme of the influence advanced technology has on our humanity. The film is deeply flawed, riddled with plot holes and bad acting (everyone aside from Max von Sydow catches that bug), both too simple and too complex for its own good. But the film is also deeply poetic, filled with incredible moments of natural and human beauty and memorable scenes that make you forget the film surrounding them and appreciate them on their own. The film moves at its own pace and the story is often only an excuse to showcase the director’s world and imagination, which the film does admirably. This is not a film for the masses, it’s hardly for anyone but the director and maybe his cast and crew, but if you can forget that for a while, you can get lost in the film, which maybe is the best thing cinema has to offer.

Random Observations:

Bis ans Ende der Welt at the IMDb

This review is based on the 280 minute director’s cut, not the significantly shorter theatrical release. And yes, I saw all three parts of the trilogy in one sitting.

The version I watched was also lacking subtitles (despite Italian, which is not one of my strong languages, to put it mildly), so I’m not really sure I fully understand all of the French dialogue scattered throughout the film.

Naturally, Wim Wenders’ favourite actor Rüdiger Vogler, is also in this film. And in an unprecedented turn, he is actually extremely tolerable in this film.

My favourite scene/sequence is probably in the last part, when the impromptu band is formed. It’s oddly emotional.

I’m not a big fan of the score (because to me it all sounds the same), but the soundtrack of the film is amazing, especially coupled with some of the scenes.

The film features an amazingly accurate satellite navigation system in an unusual bit of actually guessing the future right. It also features, however, video phones, which basically every sci-fi concept ever has and which have never and will never catch on.